Saturday, 18 April 2015

P is for Pettifogging


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is: Pettifogging.

Pettifogging: Petty or trivial.


“Look, his horse’s tunic isn’t pressed properly. There’s a big crease in that lion.”

“Oh, yes?” Mabel eyed her rival scornfully. “At least I know how to buff a breastplate. Verily your husband’s armour is as dull as ditchwater.”

Deirdre fumed. It didn’t matter that her brave knight Lionel won most jousts against Edward. Mabel focussed on these pettifogging details as a defence, and dragged Deirdre down to her level.

“Aha!” said Deirdre, eyes aglow. “Another knight hath knocked your husband off his horse with his lance.”

“With no style,” said Mabel. “My Edward knows how to fall beautifully.”

Friday, 17 April 2015

O is for Oneiric


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is: Oneiric.

Oneiric: Relating to dreams or dreaming.

The wrong people had got wind of his methods, he was sure of it. He was an oneiric investigator, the first of his kind. He had nailed many a perp from the visions he’d had in his sleep. But it wasn’t recognised by the authorities, so he worked privately.

But something was going wrong. He hadn’t dreamt at all the last few nights. That was bad when bodies were piling up. He’d woken up at night, sweating and panting. Most people who had violent dreams filled with death and gore wanted them to stop, but he was the opposite.

Thursday, 16 April 2015

N is for Nystagmus


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is: Nystagmus.

Nystagmus: Rapid involuntary movements of the eyes.

Geoffrey shook in fear, his eyes flicking from side to side rapidly.

“Be still, child!” said Father Simpkins, flicking holy water into Timothy’s face. Timothy blinked; the priest was just a restless shape before him.

“Begone, foul demon!”

After many more exhortations, the priest turned to his parents and said, “I am sorry, but the devil’s influence is too strong. The boy will have to be taken to a sanctuary for further measures.”


It was a few centuries too early for the priest to know the condition had a name – nystagmus, and it was only made worse by stressful situations.

Wednesday, 15 April 2015

M is for Myrmidon, and Already Home Cover Reveal


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is: Myrmidon.

Myrmidon: A follower or subordinate of a powerful person, especially one who is willing to engage in dishonest activities.


He owed a debt to Mr Hasbrough, which was what Olly didn’t understand. Kept calling him a “myrmidon”, whatever that was. His kid brother’s fancy university education had left him with too many big words and not enough survival skills. If Mr Hasbrough hadn’t saved him from that gang, he would have been dead and so would Olly, because they’d promised to hunt down his family. So he might run a few scams, fleece a few gullible people. That was the real world and if he didn’t – well, all Olly’s big words weren’t going to help him.

*

Also for M, today I am featuring Heather M. Gardner with the cover reveal for the re-release of the first Maguire's Corner novel, Already Home!

Already Home

A Maguire’s Corner novel




Title: Already Home
Second Edition: formerly Maguire’s Corner
Author: Heather M. Gardner
Genre: Contemporary Romantic Suspense
Cover Design: Najla Qamber Designs
Re-release Date: May 20, 2015

~~~)(~~~
Coffee shop owner Maggie Maguire doesn’t trust the new police chief her father hired to protect Maguire’s Corner. He’s a stranger, cold, bossy and annoyingly handsome. But, Maggie’s witnessed a serious crime and now someone’s trying to kill her. The man that aggravates her most might be the only one that can help her.

Police Chief Jack Munro likes his new job and his new town, and unfortunately he also likes the stubborn but beautiful town sweetheart. His self-imposed hands-off Maggie policy is about to be put to the ultimate test when he must keep her close to protect her while he tracks down a ruthless killer.

Determined to ignore Jack’s charms, Maggie attempts to help him unravel the mystery but when their lives hang in the balance she must decide how much she’s willing to risk to save the man she suddenly can’t resist.

~~~)(~~~

Heather M. Gardner's love of books began on the hand-woven rugs of her small town library where her mother worked. There she had a never-ending supply of stories to read at her fingertips. As a teen, her favorite genres to curl up with were romance and mysteries. When she started to create her own stories, they were the perfect fit.

Heather resides in New York with her best friend who is also her husband, plus her talented and handsome son. She is currently owned by four stray cats. Heather's a full-time mom, works part-time from home, a chocolate enthusiast, coffee junkie, cat addict, book hoarder and fluent in sarcasm.


Blog:
The Waiting is the Hardest Part

Twitter: @hmgardner

Goodreads: HMGardner 

Facebook: HeatherWritesRomance Bottom of Form


Tuesday, 14 April 2015

L is for Lour


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is: Lour.

Lour: 1. (of the sky) Look dark and threatening. 2. Look angry or sullen; scowl.

The sky was louring, as if Heaven itself disapproved of what he had done. Which of course it would do. He headed for home after disposing of the shovel by chucking it in a thick clump of trees.

As he drove, he thought of what he could have done differently. He hadn’t meant to kill him, but Nigel just pushed things one step too far. It was self-defence really, although the police wouldn’t see it like that. And as the clouds burst and rain hammered the car like angry globs of spit, it looked like God didn’t either.

Monday, 13 April 2015

K is for Kludge


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is Kludge.

Kludge: Something hastily or badly put together.

It was a real kludge and he knew it, hammered together with mismatched planks and nails knocked in at odd angles. When Sandra had asked him to build a kennel for Bobo – his dog, he still thought – at her new house after she was done divorcing him, he couldn’t believe her cheek.

It was a bit mean to the dog, but it should do the trick. Sure enough, she chewed his ear off when the storm shredded the kennel, leaving a sodden Bobo yowling at her back door, but he knew she wouldn’t ask him for a favour ever again.

Saturday, 11 April 2015

J is for Jejune


For this year's A-Z Challenge I have selected a word from the dictionary for each day and written a story around it with a 100 word limit. For extra interest I have chosen words that are unknown or unfamiliar to me. All definitions are from the Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus 2007 Edition. Today's word is Jejune.

Jejune: 1. Naive and simplistic. 2. (Of ideas or writings) dull.

Everything had been terribly jejune before April. He didn’t know what it was, he was just going round in circles, nothing was happening in his novel, the characters needed a personality transplant or just a kick up the jacksie. But the stuff he was doing now was some of his best ever writing. Having to come up with a different short story every day was making his synapses fizz and go in loads of directions. And daily feedback helped to show what might be worth pursuing. Already he had ideas for several books. He’d recommend the A-Z Challenge to anyone.